HTML5 FOR WEB DESIGNERS BY JEREMY KEITH PDF

When the book first landed on my doorstep, I was a bit let down by its meagre length of around 85 pages. I have to be honest, however, and admit I had not done my research before its arrival. After reading through it, my opinion has changed. I realise exactly what A Book Apart were aiming to create when they decided on a short format for the series. HTML 5 for Designers is split up into six bite-size chapters:.

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In an industry that is growing so rapidly, it was comforting to think that one of the major technologies in use - HTML - was static. This allowed me to allocate my efforts elsewhere, furthering my understanding of things like ColdFusion, Javascript, and CSS. But, all of this has now changed; or, has it? I believe that much of my frustrating with HTML5 can be attributed to a lack of understanding. What is HTML5? How much has changed? Can I use it yet? What is core? What is vendor-specific?

What about IE6? With all of these questions floating around in my head, the idea of learning HTML5 seemed somewhat overwhelming. I'm a slow reader and it took me about two hours to get from cover to cover. Not only does the book quickly and efficiently cover what's new and what's "obsolete" in HTML5, it acts as a sanity check - a re-grounding in reality; it takes this amorphous technology and codifies it, transforming it from a daunting task into an exciting opportunity.

If I had one complaint about the book, it was that it didn't really outline any "best practices. Even the author echoes this sentiment to some degree:. What's more problematic is that Article and Section are so very similar. All that separates them is the word "self-contained.

Instead, it's a matter of interpretation. You can have multiple articles within a section, you can multiple sections within an article, you can nest sections within sections and articles within articles. It's up to you to decide which element is the most semantically appropriate in any given situation. Page Much to his credit, however, Jeremy does go on to iterate through a Section example and how one can use "The Outline Algorithm" in order to ensure that content organization remains meaningful.

What would have really brought the concept home, however, would have been a screen shot of a web site with the various elements outlined and labelled with their appropriate HTML5 tags ie.

Header, HGroup, Section, Article, etc. All in all, I really enjoyed this book. Much like Cody Lindley's "jQuery Enlightenment" eBook , it definitely hit the sweet spot of brevity and clarity.

It made me much more comfortable with the idea of HTML5 and left me feeling excited to embrace it rather than overwhelmed at the thought of having to learn it. So what was your takeaway? Is there much you can even reliably use with acceptable browser coverage right now? If not how many decades can we expect before it's safe to do so?

Yeah, you can definitely start using most of the HTML5 markup tags. With IE pre IE9 , you have to include a tiny bit of Javascript in order to allow styling of the new tags; but, other than that, things like Article, Section, Header, etc.

The embedded tags, on the other hand, are a bit trickier. Audio, Video, and Canvas don't work everywhere as they require much more functionality not simply layout. But, there are ways to allow graceful degradation into Flash for example in browsers that don't support it. When I went to the iBookstore in my iPad yesterday, it was among the 6 or so featured books on the home page!

I went to the A List Apart website and saw that they had it in ePub format there too, which I believe is also iBook compatible. I figured, if jQuery UI could do it in a cross-browser way, I could look into how they did it, and then I could do it in a cross-browser way too.

I discovered quite a lot of current browser support for within-the-page drag-and-drop. Then I discovered that HTML5 had plans to allow dragging something from outside of the page onto the page too! Most cited example: dragging files from the desktop to a file upload droppable. Drag-and-drop really caught my imagination. It allows data entry without typing. Imagine a manager's lists of personnel and projects, and initiating a task assignment by dragging a person's name onto a task's name, or vice versa.

That event could trigger a dialog with person name and task name already filled in, and all you have to type is the billable hours estimate. It really helped to me understand "why"! Its not a book on how, but why. Great book, and it does have some screenshots and notes showing how HTML5 block tags article, header, etc can be effectively used on an existing website starting on p43 with the guardian. Yeah, the drag and drop stuff is very cool. We are planning to use it in a internal application that we use and I am very excited to get more into it.

Of course, the drag-n-drop is only have the battle, right? Once the events are registered, the files still need to be uploaded through a different process ex. Flash upload, form POST, etc. Any way, really looking forward to looking into it. I remember the days of nesting tables, often 5 deep, in order to get the layout that we needed, and having to hunt down that missing TD tag here and there.

Not that we ColdFusion types have to worry about that sort of stuff. That gives CF a chance to serve up a different manifest. But not every reader of this blog is a CF type, so it's really great to see the ExpiresByType syntax. So thanks for the URL.

Could you fix this for me? I remember those days indeed! The worst was having to create tables that has 1px borders on it before the table border could really be controlled with CSS.

I always had to have a table with one cell and background color and then a nested table with a cellSpacing of "1" JUST to get a 1px border. Super junky :. Yeah, that HTML5 template looks awesome.

Has that Chrome music video and nine others that will blow your mind. You'll swear it's Flash-based. Thanks for the reminder, book recommendation, and the reassurance that it isn't that big of a deal after all. But, is worth learning. It's about time to start seriously looking into this! Hello Ben, I got a copy of the book and went through it. Thanks for your overview on the book. I don't know if you could recommend any good book teaching CSS3.

Chome definitely does some really awesome stuff with HTML5. That whole Google Gravity thing was awesome. I wasted like 5 minutes playing with that the other day :. Yeah, it was definitely comforting to read the book. I'll have a review up of it later this week if I can finish it. CSS is definitely something a bit trickier to recommend a book about.

It's been a while since I've read a book on that stuff. From what I remember, the following books were very good:. That was a couple of years ago. Even the author echoes this sentiment to some degree: What's more problematic is that Article and Section are so very similar. Page 68 Much to his credit, however, Jeremy does go on to iterate through a Section example and how one can use "The Outline Algorithm" in order to ensure that content organization remains meaningful.

I personally hate the HTML language design. Link rel? At I get more into this, I'd definitely like to post more follow up stuff. Aaron, Agreed. Like I said, it really hits the sweet spot. Ben, When I went to the iBookstore in my iPad yesterday, it was among the 6 or so featured books on the home page!

And I was hooked. HTML5 is the most fun web development has been since the mids. Steve, Yeah, the drag and drop stuff is very cool.

Marcin, Thanks for the links. I've taken a look at the Apple one - good stuff. Glyn, Jen, Cool, I'll have to check that out. Sounds like a good read.

Bob, Yeah, I particularly liked line of.

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HTML5 For Web Designers

It is also the most powerful, and in some ways, the most confusing. What do accessible, content-focused standards-based web designers and front-end developers need to know? HTML5 isn't as confusing as it once was, but it still isn't straightforward. It's an evolutionary, rather than revolutionary, change in the ongoing story of markup—and if you're currently creating websites with any version of HTML, you're already using HTML5. Harness the power of this essential evolving spec with help from Jeremy Keith. Brush up on syntax and updated elements, and get ready to work with responsive images, microformats, and microdata. Through clear, practical examples, you'll be up to speed in no time.

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HTML5 For Web Designers.pdf

Author: Jeremy Keith. Harness the power of this essential evolving spec with help from Jeremy Keith and Rachel Andrew. Brush up on syntax and updated elements, and get ready to work with responsive images, microformats, and microdata. This book gives you a solid intruction to the topic, combining theory with practical lessons. CSS Optimization Basics covers the necessary mindsets, discusses the main optimization methods, and presents useful resources to write higher quality CSS.

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A Book Apart: HTML5 For Web Designers By Jeremy Keith

In an industry that is growing so rapidly, it was comforting to think that one of the major technologies in use - HTML - was static. This allowed me to allocate my efforts elsewhere, furthering my understanding of things like ColdFusion, Javascript, and CSS. But, all of this has now changed; or, has it? I believe that much of my frustrating with HTML5 can be attributed to a lack of understanding.

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