COASTAL GROINS AND NEARSHORE BREAKWATERS PDF

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No Downloads. Views Total views. Actions Shares. Embeds 0 No embeds. No notes for slide. Coastal groins-and-nearshore-breakwaters 1. This manual provides guidance for the design and placement of beach stabilizationstructures, specifically groins, nearshore breakwaters, and submerged sills. This manual applies to major subordinate commands, districts, laboratories, andfield operating activities FOA having responsibility for the design of civil works projects.

Design of beach stabilization structures is complex. It requires analyses of the wave,current, and longshore transport environments and the coastal processes at a project site.

It requiresknowledge of the functional performance of the various shore stabilization schemes, the application ofengineering judgment and experience to the design, and the structural design of a system that willwithstand the marine environment and function as intended. Beach stabilization structure designs aresite specific, and no single scheme is best for all situations; consequently, each design must be tailoredto its specific objectives and site.

This manual provides guidelines and design concepts but does not,in most cases, provide detailed design procedures. EM 20 Aug 92Chapter 1 the beach fill, even if the loss proves to be temporary. Introduction Little, if any, notice is given to the protection the fill provided to upland areas and the economic loss it may have prevented. Also, the sand may not necessarily have been lost, but may have been moved to an offshore bar.

Purpose and Scope In some cases, the rising cost of sand placement is caus- ing the economic viability of beach fills to decrease. InThis manual provides guidance for the design and place- other cases, repeated beach fills have developed a publicment of beach stabilization structures, specifically groins, perception that beach fills and required periodic renourish-nearshore breakwaters, and submerged sills.

It is therefore politically and economically necessary to lengthen the interval between Applicability renourishments or rehabilitative beach fills, i. This increased longevity can be accomplisheddistricts, laboratories, and field operating activities FOA by the prudent design and placement of several types ofhaving responsibility for the design of civil works beach stabilization structures. The design and placementprojects. References Engineer Manual.

Required and related publications are listed in b. Protective and beach stabilization structures. AAppendix A. The purpose of the former is to Background protect inland development and to armor the shoreline against erosion; the purpose of the latter is to retard beachIn highly developed beach communities, the consequences erosion, increase the longevity of a beach fill, and main-of previously ignored or unanticipated beach erosion may tain a wide beach for damage reduction and recreation.

Generally the "hard" structures require special sitingconsiderations and an accompanying beach fill to mitigate Overview of Manualadverse effects on adjacent beaches. Beach fills are oftenthe preferred and sometimes the most cost-effective The design of successful beach stabilization structuresalternative. These "soft" structures include artificial beach involves applying knowledge of the physical environmentberms and dunes accompanied by periodic beach and coastal processes at a site to the selection of a type ofnourishments, feeder beaches, or sand bypassing systems.

The economic justification for beach stabili-the ocean shore and prevent return of the damaging ero- zation structures is the savings realized by increasing thesion processes to or beneath the landward development. The cost of hard beach stabi-contribute to recreation, and add needed beach material to lization structures should be less than the beachthe shore processes rather than simply redistributing avail- nourishment savings realized.

If, for example, includingable sand. An Engineer Manual on beach-fill design is in beach stabilization structures in a project increases thepreparation at the US Army Engineer Waterways Experi- renourishment period from 3 to 6 years, the amortizedment Station. Discussion a. Design of beach stabilization structures is a.

Beach fills. Because beach fills are vulnerable to complex. It requires analyses of the wave, current, andsevere storms, they may be short-lived when a storm is longshore transport environments and the coastal pro-experienced soon after the fill has been placed.

This cesses at a project site. It requires knowledge of theshort existence is often viewed by the public as failure of 6. EM Aug 92functional performance of the various shore stabilization achieve the desired effect.

Beach stabilization structure designsare site specific, and no single scheme is best for all e. Chapter 5. Chapter 5 deals with construction andsituations; consequently, each design must be tailored to postconstruction activities, specifically, constructionits specific objectives and site.

This manual provides records, inspections, and project monitoring. Monitoringguidelines and design concepts but does not, in most data include: ground photography, aerial photography,cases, provide detailed design procedures.

References to inspection reports, beach and dune profile surveys, wavethe source of detailed design procedures are cited where data, other environmental data, wave force data, and eco-appropriate. Requirements of the Oper- ations and Maintenance Manual that must be developed to b.

Chapter 2. Chapter 2 provides general design assist local sponsors in properly operating beach stabiliza-considerations for beach stabilization structures, alterna- tion projects are discussed. This manual is required undertive types of beach stabilization structures, the various ER Appendix A is a list of references cited. Appendix B is a compilation of the advantages and disad- vantages of the various types of beach stabilization c.

Chapter 3. Chapter 3 deals with the functional and systems. Groins, nearshore breakwaters, submerged sills,structural design of groins and groin systems. Groin and alternative beach stabilization schemes are considered. Appendix E providescurrent, and earth forces on groins are also discussed. Chapter 4. Chapter 4 deals with nearshore breakwater.

Design objectives are outlined along with descriptions ofsingle and multiple nearshore breakwaters, artificialheadlands, and submerged sills. Design factors includeselecting the desired shoreline configuration and thebreakwater height, length, distance from shore,permeability, spacing, and type of construction that will 7. EM 20 Aug 92Chapter 2 design of revetments, bulkheads, and seawalls is discussedDesign Considerations for in EM Beach Stabilization Structures 2 Shore-connected structures.

General Design Objectives the two types of beach stabilization structures in this category. Groins are the most common shore-connected a. Structural versus nonstructural alternatives. They are usually built perpendicular to shore to interrupt the normal transport of 1 Beach stabilization structures alone do not pro- sand alongshore.

Wave-induced longshore currents movevide the sand to maintain a wide protective or recreational sediment and cause it to accumulate in a fillet along thebeach; they simply redistribute available sand. The groin also shelters a short reach of shore-unless additional sand is introduced into the project area. TheThe design of shore protection without concomitant beach accumulation of sand in a fillet along the updrift side ofnourishment must recognize that more sand in one area the groin reorients the shoreline and reduces the angleoften means less in another area.

The degree of allowable between the shoreline and the prevailing incident waves. Diminished sand transport past a 2 Beach and dune restorations are often vulnerable groin reduces the amount of sand contributed to theand short lived due to the frequency and intensity of downdrift area and often causes erosion.

Frequently,coastal storms. In addition to providing protection, several groins are spaced along a beach to stabilize a longhowever, they also contribute additional sand to the lit- reach of shoreline.

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Coastal Groins and Nearshore Breakwaters

This manual provides guidance for the design and placement of beach stabilizationstructures, specifically groins, nearshore breakwaters, and submerged sills. This manual applies to major subordinate commands, districts, laboratories, andfield operating activities FOA having responsibility for the design of civil works projects. Design of beach stabilization structures is complex. It requires analyses of the wave,current, and longshore transport environments and the coastal processes at a project site. It requiresknowledge of the functional performance of the various shore stabilization schemes, the application ofengineering judgment and experience to the design, and the structural design of a system that willwithstand the marine environment and function as intended. Beach stabilization structure designs aresite specific, and no single scheme is best for all situations; consequently, each design must be tailoredto its specific objectives and site.

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