HOMONYM HOMOGRAPH HOMOPHONE PDF

This word set can be confusing, even for word geeks. Let's start with the basics. A homograph is a word that has the same spelling as another word but has a different sound and a different meaning:. A homophone is a word that has the same sound as another word but is spelled differently and has a different meaning:. Not so bad, right? The ending —graph means drawn or written, so a homograph has the same spelling.

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Words that fall under any of these three categories often confuse readers and writers alike. But they need not perplex you: Understanding the meaning of these three grammatical terms and, especially, being able to recognize them can help clear up any confusion. The first column contains homonyms in alphabetical order, while the second and third columns list the corresponding homonym, homophone, or homograph as applicable.

Complete each of the following sentences by filling in the blank with the correct word. You'll find the answers at the end of the exercise. To heighten interest, all of the sentences are quotes from various authors' writings in books and magazine articles published over the years. Feel free to use the previous table to help you if you get stumped. Share Flipboard Email. Richard Nordquist. English and Rhetoric Professor. Richard Nordquist is professor emeritus of rhetoric and English at Georgia Southern University and the author of several university-level grammar and composition textbooks.

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Homonyms vs. Homophones vs. Homographs

Words that fall under any of these three categories often confuse readers and writers alike. But they need not perplex you: Understanding the meaning of these three grammatical terms and, especially, being able to recognize them can help clear up any confusion. The first column contains homonyms in alphabetical order, while the second and third columns list the corresponding homonym, homophone, or homograph as applicable. Complete each of the following sentences by filling in the blank with the correct word. You'll find the answers at the end of the exercise. To heighten interest, all of the sentences are quotes from various authors' writings in books and magazine articles published over the years.

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What’s The Difference Between A “Homograph,” “Homonym,” And “Homophone”?

Homonyms vs. Homophones vs. Homographs The most frequently confused words in English are used wrongly mainly because they are very identical. But all these similarities are actually defined in the English grammar as homonyms, homophones and homographs.

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200 Homonyms, Homophones, and Homographs

In linguistics , homonyms , broadly defined, are words which are homographs words that share the same spelling, regardless of pronunciation or homophones words that share the same pronunciation, regardless of spelling , or both. A more restrictive or technical definition sees homonyms as words that are simultaneously homographs and homophones [1] — that is to say they have identical pronunciation and spelling, whilst maintaining different meanings. A distinction is sometimes made between true homonyms, which are unrelated in origin, such as skate glide on ice and skate the fish , and polysemous homonyms, or polysemes , which have a shared origin, such as mouth of a river and mouth of an animal. The relationship between a set of homonyms is called homonymy , and the associated adjective is homonymous. The adjective "homonymous" can additionally be used wherever two items share the same name, [4] [5] [ clarification needed ] independent of how closely they are or are not related in terms of their meaning or etymology. Note: for the h sound, see rough breathing and smooth breathing.

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