GREWIA BICOLOR PDF

Common names: white raisin Eng. It is a frost-resistant, hardy shrub or small tree that is adaptable to all soils, from clay to sand, and does not require much water. Grewia bicolor is a multi-stemmed shrub or small tree, up to 9 m high. Its bark is smooth, grey, becoming dark grey and deeply fissured and peeling away in straps with age. The young branchlets are velvety grey or brown.

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Grewia bicolor A. The bark is dark grey, deeply fissured and scaly in older trees. The leaves are alternate, elliptic to lanceolate, 1.

The flowers are pentamerous, yellow, 1. The fruit is a 2-lobed drupe, sometimes hairy, orange to purple black in colour and with a hard woody endocarp Orwa et al. The wood is valuable for construction, utensils, fuel and charcoal. The bark can be used for ropes. Sticks are useful for basketry.

Bark and roots have many ethno-medicinal properties due to their high content in triterpenes and alkaloids Baumer, ; Jasper et al. The bark is used to clarify muddy water and sorghum wort, and to alleviate the bitterness of sorghum beer Orwa et al. The mucilaginous leaves can be infused or used as binding agents in sauces.

The tree is used as an ornamental tree, as a shade tree and as bee forage Orwa et al. The fruits may be used as fodder Orwa et al. It grows in low to medium altitudes, on rocky slopes, river banks or low lying depressions. It has also been found at higher altitudes up to m. It does well on rich, shallow sandy soils, occasionally on red clays Brink, Seeds can be stored up to one year before sowing.

It coppices and prunes easily Brink, During the dry season, Grewia bicolor is a necessary fodder for pure browsing species such as the Western Giant eland Taurotragus derbianus derbianus , a critically endangered antelope. Grewia bicolor and other woody savanna species should thus be considered for conservation in enclosures Hejcmanova et al.

However, the extremely dense foliage of Grewia bicolor can also impede access by browsers, thus reducing availability Pellew, No specific literature seems available on the utilisation of Grewia bicolor in rabbit feeding June Nevertheless because foliage of other Grevia spp e.

However, specific studies are desirable. Avg: average or predicted value; SD: standard deviation; Min: minimum value; Max: maximum value; Nb: number of values samples used. False brandy bush Grewia bicolor. Search form. Sponsored by. Automatic translation. Feed categories. Scientific names. Plant and animal families Plant and animal species. Datasheet Description Click on the "Nutritional aspects" tab for recommendations for ruminants, pigs, poultry, rabbits, horses, fish and crustaceans.

Common names. Other forage plants Forage trees Forage plants. Related feed s. Bhimal Grewia optiva Grewia Grewia kakothamnos. Forage management. Environmental impact. Biodiversity conservation During the dry season, Grewia bicolor is a necessary fodder for pure browsing species such as the Western Giant eland Taurotragus derbianus derbianus , a critically endangered antelope.

Nutritional attributes. No information found Tables of chemical composition and nutritional value. False brandy bush Grewia bicolor , aerial part, fresh False brandy bush Grewia bicolor , leaves, dry False brandy bush Grewia bicolor , fruits. False brandy bush Grewia bicolor , aerial part, fresh.

False brandy bush Grewia bicolor , leaves, dry. Dry leaves on the ground or remaining on the branches at the end of the dry season. False brandy bush Grewia bicolor , fruits. Aganga, A. Significance of browses in the nutrition of Tswana goats. Mineral contents of browse plants in Kweneng District in Botswana.

Agricultural Journal, 3 2 : Augustino, S. Medicinal resources of the Miombo woodlands of Urumwa, Tanzania: Plants and its uses. Plants Res. Notes on trees and shrubs in arid and semi-arid regions. Grewia bicolor Juss.. In: Louppe, D. The contribution of browse to cattle fodder in the sedentary system of the Office du Niger. In: Browse in Africa, the current state of knowledge.

Browse plants of Kenya - with special reference to those occurring in South Baringo. In vitro digestibility and degradability in situ in the rumen of woody forage available on natural grasslands in Senegal. First results. Pays Trop. Diet composition of western Derby eland Taurotragus derbianus derbianus in a dry season in a natural and a managed habitat in Senegal using faecal analyses. South Afr.

Wildlife Res. The encyclopedia of fruit and nuts. Investigation of Grewia bicolor Juss.. The mineral scoring technique and evaluation of indigenous browse species as natural mineral phytocentres for goats in African rangelands.

Health Prod. Farmers' knowledge in the utilisation of indigenous browse species for feeding of goats in semi arid central Tanzania. Rural Dev. Chemical composition and nutritive value of browse in tropical West Africa.

The role of browses in the Sahelian and Sudanian zones. Browse in Africa. The current state of knowledge. Screening of potential indigenous browse species in semi-arid central Tanzania. A case of Gairo division. Les ligneux fourragers du Nord-Cameroun.

Browse trees of north Cameroon. Inventory and phenology. Agroforestree Database: a tree reference and selection guide version 4. Species abundance, food preference and nutritive value of goat diets in the semi-arid lands of east-central Kenya. In: Small ruminant Research and Development in Africa. The production and consumption of Acacia browse and its potential for animal protein production. Behaviour of goats, sheep and cattle and their selection of browse species on natural pasture in a Sahelian area.

Small Rumin. The biodiversity of predominant lactic acid bacteria in dolo and pito wort for the production of sorghum beer. Influence of woody plant cover on dietary selection by goats in an Acacia senegal savanna of East Africa.

Rangeland dynamics in South Omo Zone of Southern Ethiopia: Assessment of rangeland condition in relation to altitude and Grazing types. A review of browse and its role in livestock production in southern Africa. In vitro assessment of ruminal fermentation characteristics of tropical browse mixtures supplemented with yeast.

Datasheet citation. Image credits. Dreyer, A. Agricultural Journal, 3 2 : Augustino, S. Baumer, M. Brink, M.

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Grewia bicolor

Grewia bicolor A. The bark is dark grey, deeply fissured and scaly in older trees. The leaves are alternate, elliptic to lanceolate, 1. The flowers are pentamerous, yellow, 1. The fruit is a 2-lobed drupe, sometimes hairy, orange to purple black in colour and with a hard woody endocarp Orwa et al.

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The wood of Grewia bicolor is used in house construction poles, beams and made into a range of articles including tool handles, herding staffs and walking sticks, bows, arrows, spear shafts, knobkerries and clubs, pegs, rakes and saddle frames. In Burkina Faso sticks are woven into baskets. The wood is also used for firesticks, as fuel wood and made into charcoal. The sweet, mealy fruit pulp is eaten fresh, or dried as candy. Juice from the fruit is drunk fresh, added to porridge, fermented into beer or distilled into liquor. The mucilaginous leaves and fibres from the leaf are used as binding agent in sauces.

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Numerous, see text or Complete list. Formerly, Grewia was placed in either the family Tiliaceae or the Sparrmanniaceae. However, these were both not monophyletic with respect to other Malvales - as already indicated by the uncertainties surrounding placement of Grewia and similar genera - and have thus been merged into the Malvaceae. Together with the bulk of the former Sparrmanniaceae , Grewia is in the subfamily Grewioideae and therein the tribe Grewieae , of which it is the type genus. The genus was named by Carl Linnaeus , in honor of the botanist Nehemiah Grew from England.

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