ESCUCHANDO A THE DOORS GREIL MARCUS PDF

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — The Doors by Greil Marcus. Five years later it was all over. Forty years after the singer Jim Morrison was found dead in Paris and the group disbanded, one could drive from here to there, changing from one FM pop station to another, and be all but guaranteed to hear two, three, four Doors songs in an hour—every hour.

Whatever the demands in the music, they remained unsatisfied, in the largest sense unfinished, and absolutely alive. There have been many books on the Doors. This is the first to bypass their myth, their mystique, and the death cult of both Jim Morrison and the era he was made to personify, and focus solely on the music.

It is a story untold; all these years later, it is a new story. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. More Details Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Doors , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Nov 20, Tosh rated it really liked it. Reading Greil Marcus is always a pleasure. And its the reason why I am reading this particular book, because I really don't have a passion for the Doors or their imagery.

But on the other hand they are a band that's important to my personal culture. It may have been the first show in a club, not sure. My mind I was around 12, but I think i was actually Nevertheless I went there with m Reading Greil Marcus is always a pleasure. Nevertheless I went there with my Dad to see Them, and the Doors was a superb surprise. I think it may have been before their first album was released, but I remember being really impressed with Jim Morrison's voice.

It sooth as well as rocked. And there was something quite personal in the way they communicated with their audience in the club. On the other hand, Them was very cold and cool.

Not a bad thing mind you, but totally the opposite of the Doors. The next I saw the Doors it was at an outside concert - and I thought they were boring. They didn't have that concentration or the force of their show at the Whiskey. And at this time it was around the height of "Light My Fire. Then all of sudden Stills shows up and tells the security guard to let Morrison stay.

And that was my memory of the evening! The next time after that I saw him in Topanga Canyon, drinking beer in a brown bag behind a wheel of a parked Volkswagon bug. Of course all of above could have just been a dream, but But back to the book, Marcus uses the Doors' culture and music as a springboard on his thoughts on 's American culture.

Marcus is writing this book as not only a fan and he's a very critical fan but also the state of the world via the eyes of Jim Morrison and Co. View all 3 comments. Sep 30, David Rullo rated it did not like it. Perhaps the worst Doors book I have read and I've read many! I became suspicious when the author stated that he liked the Doors movie that was done several years ago. When even the members of the band have disowned the movie, citing inaccuries, etc.

Almost every essay, and I would say each of these chapters are more essay than chapter, talks negatively of the songs in some way--either they don't go anywhere, the band is bar Perhaps the worst Doors book I have read and I've read many! Almost every essay, and I would say each of these chapters are more essay than chapter, talks negatively of the songs in some way--either they don't go anywhere, the band is barely present, no melody, etc.

In reality, his essays seem to go nowhere. Each one seems to start in space with no general idea or thought of where it will end up or why it's being written and ends the same way. In several of the chapters most of what's being written completely ignores the song which Marcus claims is the subject. If Marcus' intent is to have the reader admire his generation's cultural touchstones more than those from the 60's and 70's then this is a great way to do it because by the end of the book the reader is so bored and disinterested he would never want to hear a Doors song or have any involvement in the decades the band recorded!

Avoid this book at all cost! View all 6 comments. Aug 30, Fred rated it it was amazing Shelves: books-that-rock. The actual music of the band serves mostly as a springboard for Professor Marcus's wide ranging, almost dizzying exploration of the zeitgeist of the era when the word "zeitgeist" gained currency.

I listened to the audiobook version on a car trip of just the right length, and the experience kind of reminded me of "My Dinner with Andre" - listening to the captivating adventures of a learned, albeit slightly manic, friend reporting back from the edges of cultural possibility. I enjoyed this kaleidoscopic whirlwind immensely, and learned a lot about southern California, pop art, and myriad other subjects.

View 2 comments. May 16, John rated it did not like it Shelves: so-bad-that-i-couldn-t-finish-it. One star is being very generous. Unorganized jargon about The Doors and Oliver Stone. Made it through 40 pages before I gave in.

Save yourself some time and stay clear. Jun 21, Jim Cherry rated it it was amazing. Marcus, best known for music criticism and pop culture, is a Doors fan, but an objective one, he is well versed in all aspects of music and the artists but also the language of music and focuses his lens on The Doors. Feb 03, Roberto rated it liked it. A good validation of much of what The Doors stood for.

Like their music much of this is grasping for something just out of reach, something elusive. I especially liked the piece on Wallace Berman and Pop-art.

I didn't agree with his dismissal of so much of their music - sometimes all this Morrison-bashing just makes me want to crank up Shaman's Blues - but I think that has something to do with context, whether you were there a A good validation of much of what The Doors stood for. I didn't agree with his dismissal of so much of their music - sometimes all this Morrison-bashing just makes me want to crank up Shaman's Blues - but I think that has something to do with context, whether you were there at the time, or in my case, not.

Much like the stick Elvis gets for those dreadful movies which I kind of love , it has to do with ideas of selling out, notions of authenticity, which don't really matter now. For those of us born after the death of Morrison, or Elvis, it is the flaws that allow us to see beyond the mystique, mystique is boring. I grew up listening to The Doors, sometimes laughing at them, but believing in them, and I still do, so does Marcus most of the time.

The writing here was really good, and when he gets down to the music he really nails it, all the little nuances that matter. He tells you that The Doors offered the world a new kind of dread, that they were harbingers of something that seemed to take shape in the Manson murders. Marcus refers to the Oliver Stone movie quite a lot, he likes it, which is pretty funny. I like it too, but not as much as Clambake.. Feb 05, Eduardo Moraes rated it really liked it.

It was what kept you up all night, and not just the night Bobby Kennedy was shot… Dread was why every day could feel like a trap. In this setting, the Doors were a presence. They were a band people felt they had to see — not to learn, to find out, to hear the message, to get the truth, but to be in the presence of a group of people who appeared to accept the present moment at face value.

With his prose, Greil Marcus seems to paint portraits of our Western civilization much more than merely commenting on artists — such as Bob Dylan or Van Morrisson — we has written so much about.

Suddenly The Doors were not only a rock and roll band and a damn good one! A symbol of the dark side of the Sixties.

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